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Medicineworld.org: Obesity, physical inactivity and arthritis

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Obesity, physical inactivity and arthritis




Scientists from the Toronto Western Research Institute noted a higher prevalence of arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitations (AAL) in the U.S. versus the Canadian population. The authors attribute the higher prevalence of arthritis and AAL to a greater level of obesity and physical inactivity in Americans, especially women. Full findings of this study are reported in the recent issue of Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology.



Obesity, physical inactivity and arthritis

Arthritis is the leading cause of physical disability, and one of the most frequently reported chronic conditions in the U.S. and Canada. Those in mid to late life are especially vulnerable to this disabling condition, which is expected to increase in both countries due to the aging baby boomer population. As per a 2005 figure from the National Arthritis Data Workgroup more than 21% of American adults (46 million) have arthritis or another rheumatic condition and over 60% of arthritis patients are women. The 2008 Canadian Community Health Survey reported 15.3% (4.3 million) of Canadians have some form of arthritis, with more women then men affected.

This study is the first to provide a direct comparison of U.S. and Canadian data in search of between-country disparities linked to the prevalence of arthritis and AAL. The authors analyzed results from the Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health (JCUSH) conducted in cooperation by Statistics Canada and the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics during 2002-2003. Data were obtained for 3,505 Canadians and 5,183 Americans with an overall response rate of 65.5% and 50.2%, respectively.

Results show that in the U.S. the prevalence of arthritis was 18.7% and AAL was 9.6%, while equivalent estimates in Canada were 16.8% and 7.7%, respectively. Scientists noted that arthritis prevalence was higher in American women at 23.3% compared with 19.6% of Canadian women. Women in the U.S. also had a higher prevalence of AAL than Canadian women at 13.0% versus 9.2%. The overall occurrence of arthritis and AAL in men was similar in both countries at roughly 14% and 6%, respectively.

"Our study results uggest that the higher prevalence of arthritis and AAL in the U.S. appears to be a consequence of greater obesity and physical inactivity in that country, especially in women," noted Dr. Badley. "Public health initiatives that promote healthy weight and physical activity appears to benefit from including arthritis concerns to its message, and could potentially reduce the occurence rate of arthritis and AAL," concluded Dr. Badley.


Posted by: Mark    Source




Did you know?
Scientists from the Toronto Western Research Institute noted a higher prevalence of arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitations (AAL) in the U.S. versus the Canadian population. The authors attribute the higher prevalence of arthritis and AAL to a greater level of obesity and physical inactivity in Americans, especially women. Full findings of this study are reported in the recent issue of Arthritis Care and Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology.

Medicineworld.org: Obesity, physical inactivity and arthritis

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