MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of research news blog


Go Back to the main research news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Research News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


June 15, 2007, 11:06 AM CT

Infectious diseases experts issue warnings

Infectious diseases experts issue warnings
New vaccines are available to make significant gains against cervical cancer deaths and debilitating pain from shingles, but infectious diseases experts warn that their full potential will not be realized without changes in the way vaccines for adults and adolescents are promoted, financed, and delivered in the United States.

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has released a new blueprint for action to prevent tens of thousands of deaths and illnesses caused by these and other diseases that can be avoided with a few simple shots. The blueprint is reported in the June 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

We have done a great job in this country delivering vaccines to children, but we have done an awful job delivering vaccines to adults, said Neal A. Halsey, MD, professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and chair of the IDSA Immunization Work Group that developed the policy blueprint.

For example, he points out that more than 90 percent of U.S. children are immunized against measles, mumps, whooping cough, hepatitis B, and other diseases. Rates of these diseases are at or near historic lows. In contrast, an estimated 175,000 adults are hospitalized and 6,000 die each year from pneumococcal pneumonia, but one in three adults over 65 has not been vaccinated against it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that the cost of treating diseases that vaccines could prevent exceeds $10 billion annually.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


June 13, 2007, 1:33 PM CT

Mechanism Of Action Used By Sorafenib

Mechanism Of Action Used By Sorafenib
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center scientists have uncovered a new mechanism of action of the anti-cancer drug sorafenib, which could stimulate the development of novel regimens in which it is combined with other molecularly targeted agents for patients with blood cancers and solid tumors.

In the new study, led by Steven Grant, M.D., Massey's associate director for translational research and co-leader of the cancer center's cancer cell biology program, VCU scientists identified a mechanism by which sorafenib inhibits protein translation, and which may be involved in reducing expression of pro-survival factors, such as Mcl-1, and other proteins. The findings were published online in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology on June 4.

As per Grant, sorafenib, or Nexavar which is manufactured by Bayer Pharmaceuticals, has recently been approved for the therapy of patients with renal cell cancer, the most common form of kidney cancer in adults. It was originally developed as an inhibitor of the oncogene, Raf, which is frequently mutated in numerous cancers, including leukemia. Oncogenes are typically responsible for promoting tumor growth.

Prior findings by Grant's team, published in the Journal of Biologic Chemistry, showed that in human leukemia cells, sorafenib lethality was less a consequence of Raf inhibition, but rather reflected interference with the synthesis of Mcl-1. They observed that sorafenib interfered with Mcl-1 translation, a process in which proteins are synthesized from their constituent amino acids. However, the mechanism by which protein translation was inhibited by sorafenib remained largely unknown.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


June 13, 2007, 10:01 AM CT

Neural stem cells reduce Parkinson's symptoms

Neural stem cells reduce Parkinson's symptoms
Stem cells
New Haven, Conn.Primates with severe Parkinsons disease were able to walk, move, and eat better, and had diminished tremors after being injected with human neural stem cells, a research team from Yale, Harvard, the University of Colorado, and the Burnham Institute report today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

These results are promising, but it will be years before it is known whether a similar procedure would have therapeutic value for humans, said the lead author, D. Eugene Redmond Jr., professor of psychiatry and neurosurgery at Yale.

Not only are stem cells a potential source of replacement cells, they also seem to have a whole variety of effects that normalize other abnormalities, Redmond said. The human neural stem cells implanted into the primates survived, migrated, and had a functional impact. Its an important step, but there are many studies that need to be done before determining if this would be of any value in clinical settings.

Parkinsons disease is caused by a degeneration of dopamine neurons in an area of the midbrain known as the substantia nigra, which is responsible for dopamine production. Reduced production of dopamine in late stage Parkinsons causes symptoms such as severe difficulty in walking, fewer movements, delays in moving, lack of appetite, difficulty eating, periods of remaining motionless known as freezing, and head and limb tremors.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


June 10, 2007, 7:30 PM CT

Genetic Risk Factor For Coeliac Disease

Genetic Risk Factor For Coeliac Disease
An international research consortium investigating the genetic causes of intestinal inflammatory conditions has identified a new genetic risk factor for coeliac disease. The findings, published online today (10 June 2007) in the science journal Nature Genetics, could pave the way towards improved diagnostics and therapys for the common, lifelong complaint.

Led by David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Queen Mary, University of London, the study - funded by the charity Coeliac UK, and the Wellcome Trust - has revealed that those suffering from coeliac disease lack a protective DNA sequence in a specific gene region, otherwise found in healthy individuals.

Behind the success of the study are the Human Genome Project and the Hap Map Project, international research efforts to reveal the entire sequence of all the human chromosomes - and the functional units embedded within - and to correlate that information to common sequence variation in the human population.

Dr Panos Deloukas, Senior Investigator in Human Genetics at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, and part of the research consortium, said: These resources coupled with technological advances have enabled us to scan variation across the human genome in large numbers of people for association to disease. The Sanger Institute made available to the study the genome data on 1500 British individuals used as controls (i.e without coeliac disease). The consortium studied over four thousand individuals with and without coeliac disease, amongst British, Irish and Dutch populations.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


June 10, 2007, 7:26 PM CT

Drug may halt Parkinson's disease

Drug may halt Parkinson's disease
Northwestern University scientists have discovered a drug that slows and may even halt the progression of Parkinsons disease. The drug rejuvenates aging dopamine cells, whose death in the brain causes the symptoms of this devastating and widespread disease.

D. James Surmeier, the Nathan Smith Davis Professor and chair of physiology at Northwestern Universitys Feinberg School of Medicine, and his team of scientists have observed that isradipine, a drug widely used for high blood pressure and stroke, restores stressed-out dopamine neurons to their vigorous younger selves. The study is described in a feature article in the international journal Nature, which will be published on-line June 10.

Dopamine is a critical chemical messenger in the brain that affects a persons ability to direct his movements. In Parkinsons disease, the neurons that release dopamine die, causing movement to become more and more difficult.

Ultimately, a person loses the ability to walk, talk or pick up a glass of water. The illness is the second most common neurodegenenerative disease in the country, affecting about 1 million people. The occurence rate of Parkinsons disease increases with age, soaring after age 60.

Our hope is that this drug will protect dopamine neurons, so that if you began taking it early enough, you wont get Parkinsons disease, even if you were at risk. said Surmeier, who heads the Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence for Parkinsons Disease Research at Northwestern. It would be like taking a baby aspirin everyday to protect your heart.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


June 10, 2007, 7:23 PM CT

Stroke study sheds light on left-right brain divide

Stroke study sheds light on left-right brain divide
Research into the effects of strokes has furthered our understanding of the different roles of the left and right sides of our brains. A study led by the University of Exeter has highlighted differences in the ability of people to perform basic tasks, depending on whether the left or right sides of their brains have been damaged by a stroke. The research identified the role of the right side of the brain in noticing and correcting errors.

The research focused on damage to the frontal lobes, the front part of the brain which is known to be responsible for aspects of language, decision making and learning. The team observed that people who had damage to their left side were more likely to realise they had made a mistake, and then correct it, in comparison to those who had damage to their right frontal lobes. Funded by the Wellcome Trust, the research is now reported in the journal Brain.

Dr Tim Hodgson, neuro-psychology expert at the University of Exeter and lead researcher on this study, said: We know that suffering a stroke in the left frontal region can affect aspects of speech and language, but this research highlights, for the first time, the additional challenges that people with right frontal-lobe damage might face in everyday life.

23 people, each with frontal lobe damage, performed a rule-switching task which involved learning rules linking the colour of a symbol on a computer screen with a movement to the left or right. All the participants made mistakes during the task, but it was those with right-brain damage who most frequently failed to spot their errors and had difficulty keep track of the changing task rules. The group with damage to the left frontal lobes corrected 68% of mistakes in the test, whereas people with right-brain damage only made corrections to 30% of their errors. This suggests that people who suffer damage to their right frontal lobe following a stroke may struggle in everyday situations which require attention to be switched flexibly from one thing to another.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


June 6, 2007, 10:02 PM CT

New Contributor To Aggressive Cancers

New Contributor To Aggressive Cancers
Mutations in the cell adhesion molecule known as integrin alpha 7 (integrin 7) lead to unchecked tumor cell proliferation and a significantly higher incidence in cancer spread, or metastasis, in several cancer cell lines, report scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in a study being published recently in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. These findings suggest that integrin 7 represents an important new target for cancer treatment and prevention.

Integrin 7 belongs to a major class of cell membrane proteins that play a role in the attachment of a cell to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the material that holds cells within a particular type of tissue together. Integrins also help cells attach to one another and are involved in transmitting chemical signals between cells and the ECM.

In this study, the researchers, led by Jianhua Luo, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in the division of molecular and cellular pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, examined whether this gene is mutated in specimens of various human cancers as well as whether the level of integrin 7 expression is linked to clinical relapse of human cancers. They also investigated whether integrin 7 has tumor suppressor activity.

To determine whether mutations in integrin 7 contribute to cancer, Dr. Luo and his collaborators sequenced the integrin 7 genes from 66 human cancer specimens and cell lines representing many different kinds of cancer, including cancer of the prostate, liver, brain (glioblastoma) and muscle (leiomyosarcoma).........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


June 6, 2007, 9:50 PM CT

Talcum powder stunts growth of lung tumors

Talcum powder stunts growth of lung tumors
Image courtesy of ubeaut.com.au
Talcum powder has been used for generations to soothe babies diaper rash and freshen womens faces. But University of Florida scientists report the household product has an additional healing power: The ability to stunt cancer growth by cutting the flow of blood to metastatic lung tumors.

The study, reported in the European Respiratory Journal in April, reveals that talc stimulates healthy cells to produce endostatin, a hormone considered the magic bullet for treating metastatic lung cancer. The UF scientists say talc is an exciting new therapeutic agent for a cancer largely considered incurable.

We found, to our surprise, that talc causes tumor growth to slow down and actually decreases the tumor bulk, said Veena Antony, M.D., a professor of pulmonary medicine and chief of pulmonary and critical care medicine at UFs College of Medicine. Talc is able to prevent the formation of blood vessels, thereby killing the tumor and choking off its growth. The tumors appeared to grow much slower and in some cases completely disappeared.

Researchers have only recently discovered that talcum powder stunts tumor growth, though the mineral has been used for almost 70 years to treat the respiratory problems that accompany metastatic lung cancer. About half of all patients accumulate fluid around the surface of the lungs, a condition known as cancerous pleural effusion.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source


June 6, 2007, 9:29 PM CT

The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein

The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein
Image courtesy of Fragile X Foundation
Scientists in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at Yale School of Medicine have identified a new regulatory target for the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), laying the groundwork for possible new therapys for Fragile X syndrome(FXS), the leading inherited form of mental retardation.

The findings, reported in the early online edition of the June Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also have implications for autism, which shares a common physiological pathway with FXS.

Fragile X syndrome is mainly caused by a mutation in the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome, leading to the loss of FMRP, which is abundantly expressed in the brain and testes. Without this protein, brain development is hampered and nerve cells cannot communicate with each other appropriately, resulting in the reduced ability to learn and memorize. Fragile X syndrome affects about one in 4,000 males and one in 8,000 females. About 20 percent of children with FXS have autism and about five percent of autistic children have FXS.

The research team led by Yingqun Huang, M.D., assistant professor in Yale Ob/Gyn, previously observed that FMRP interacts with a nuclear mRNA export protein NXF2, in the mouse brain and testes. In this study, the team used mouse neuronal cells to explore the functional characteristics of this interaction.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


June 6, 2007, 9:13 PM CT

Clues to Working Memory

Clues to Working Memory
A newly discovered interplay of cells in one of the brain's memory centers sheds light on how you recall your grocery list, where you laid your keys, and a host of important but fleeting daily tasks.

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College say their experiments with common goldfish are uncovering the secrets of a form of short-term recall known as "working memory".

"We've now identified a mechanism that can organize the activity of groups of cells involved in this important form of recall," says lead researcher Dr. Emre Aksay, assistant professor of computational neuroscience in the HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud Institute for Computational Biomedicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City.

"Furthermore, because deficits in working memory are often a precursor of schizophrenia, drugs that target this mechanism might someday help fight that debilitating disease," he says.

The findings have been published in Nature Neuroscience.

Humans rely on their working memory every day to keep track of faces and names, tasks at school or in the workplace, and other important bits of information. "This process is distinct, neurologically speaking, from the storage and retrieval of longer-term memories," explains Dr. Aksay, who is also assistant professor of physiology and biophysics at Weill Cornell.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47  

Did you know?
Scientists at Yale have brought to light a mechanism that regulates the way an internal organelle, the Golgi apparatus, duplicates as cells prepare to divide, according to a report in Science Express.Graham Warren, professor of cell biology, and colleagues at Yale study Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite that causes Sleeping Sickness. Like a number of parasites, it is exceptionally streamlined and has only one of each internal organelle, making it ideal for studying processes of more complex organisms that have a number of copies in each cell.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of research news blog

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.