MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog


Go Back to the main health news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Health News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


June 22, 2007, 5:18 AM CT

Paving the way toward a vaccine against Alzheimer's disease

Paving the way toward a vaccine against Alzheimer's disease
Journal of Biological Chemistry cover
Credit: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Bethesda, MD Researchers have provided new details about how proteins used to destroy bacteria and viruses may help treat Alzheimers disease. Gunnar K. Gouras, associate professor of neurology and neuroscience at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, and his colleagues provide new insights into how these proteins, called antibodies, reduce the main hallmarks of Alzheimers disease and raise hopes for a vaccine against the disease.

Antibodies are probably the most promising experimental approach to fight Alzheimers disease at this time, Gouras says. The discoveries made using antibodies are so encouraging that results of ongoing vaccine trials against the disease are much anticipated.

Alzheimers disease, the most common form of dementia, gradually destroys a person's memory and ability to learn, communicate, and carry out daily activities. As per the American Health Assistance Foundation, more than 4.5 million people in the United States live with the disease and more than 26 million people are affected worldwide. By 2050, the number of people who will suffer from the disease is estimated to nearly triple in the United States and to be four times as high worldwide.

Eventhough no cure for the disease is available yet, researchers are actively looking for new therapys. One of the main goals of such therapys is to destroy clumps of a protein called beta amyloid, which are found in the brains of people with the disease, either inside the nerve cells or around them. Antibodies have been shown to be effective at removing these clumps but how they do it is not completely understood.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


June 22, 2007, 5:12 AM CT

Gene Therapy For Parkinson's Disease Reported

Gene Therapy For Parkinson's Disease Reported
Image courtesy of cima
In what could be a breakthrough in the therapy of neurological disease, a team led by physician-researchers at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center has completed the first-ever phase 1 clinical trial using gene treatment to battle Parkinson's disease.

The study of 11 men and one woman with the progressive neurodegenerative illness observed that the procedure -- in which surgeons inject a harmless gene-bearing virus into the brain -- was both safe and resulted in improved motor function for Parkinson's patients over the course of one year. The findings appear in the June 23 issue of The Lancet.

"These exciting results need to be validated in a larger trial, but we believe this is a milestone -- not only for the therapy of Parkinson's disease, but for the use of gene-based therapies against neurological conditions generally," says lead researcher Dr. Michael Kaplitt, associate professor of neurological surgery and the Victor and Tara Menezes Clinical Scholar in Neurological Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College, and director of Movement Disorders Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Dr. Kaplitt has devoted much of his academic research career to the development of effective gene treatment techniques against Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders. In fact, 13 years ago, he and Dr. Matthew During pioneered a now widely used gene-delivery technique for the brain using an altered, harmless form of adeno-associated virus (AAV). In 2003, Dr. Kaplitt performed the world's first gene treatment surgery for Parkinson's, conducted at NewYork Presbyterian/Weill Cornell.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


June 22, 2007, 4:54 AM CT

Omega-3 supplements affect Alzheimer's symptoms

Omega-3 supplements affect Alzheimer's symptoms
Omega-3 supplements can, in certain cases, help combat the depression and agitation symptoms linked to Alzheimers disease, as per a clinical study conducted at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet.

Many epidemiological studies have shown that eating fatty fish provides a certain degree of protection against Alzheimers and other dementia diseasesan effect often thought attributable to the omega-3 fatty acids it contains. Some studies also suggest that omega-3 can have a therapeutic effect on some psychiatric conditions.

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University have now examined whether omega-3 supplementation has any effect on the psychiatric symptoms linked to Alzheimers disease. Just under 200 patients with mild Alzheimers were divided into two groups, one of which received omega-3, and one a placebo. The study lasted for one year.

There was no observable difference in therapeutic effect between the patients receiving the omega-3 and the placebo group. However, when the scientists took into account which of the patients carried the susceptibility gene APOE ?4 and which did not, an appreciable difference appeared. Carriers of the gene who had received active therapy responded positively to the omega-3 as regards agitation symptoms, while non-bearers of the gene showed an improvement in depressive symptoms.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


June 22, 2007, 4:52 AM CT

Pill-splitting study looks at cost-saving

Pill-splitting study looks at cost-saving
Pill-splitting requires a special inexpensive cutter, and can only be done with certain pills. It's not safe to split pills that have a time-release coating, for example, or that include medicines that exit the body quickly. But certain cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can be split safely.
Slicing certain pills in half could slice a hefty amount off of America's prescription drug costs. While only some types of pills can be split safely, the practice could be used by millions of Americans - including a number of of those who take popular cholesterol-lowering drugs.

Now, a new University of Michigan study adds more evidence that splitting a high-dose pill and swallowing half of it, rather than taking a whole low-dose pill each time, doesn't change those medicines' impact on cholesterol levels. It is also the first prospective randomized controlled trial of pill-splitting, and the first to look at the impact of out-of-pocket costs on patients' willingness to take the time to split pills.

The study is reported in the recent issue of the American Journal of Managed Care by a team from the U-M Health System and the U-M College of Pharmacy.

"This study was done in part to see what the impact would be of having some of the cost savings go back to the patient," says first author Hae Mi Choe, PharmD, CDE, clinical assistant professor in the College and a UMHS clinical pharmacist.

While the study did not find that out-of-pocket costs had an impact on the participants' tendency to split and take their pills in the six-month study, most participants said that reduced co-pays would be needed to entice them to continue splitting pills.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


June 22, 2007, 4:41 AM CT

Blood Levels of Urate And Parkinson's Disease

Blood Levels of Urate And Parkinson's Disease
In a new, large-scale, prospective study exploring the link between levels of urate in the blood and risk of Parkinson's disease, scientists from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have observed that high levels of urate are strongly linked to a reduced risk of the disease. The findings were published online on June 20, 2007 in The American Journal of Epidemiology and will appear in an upcoming print issue of the journal.

Urate is a normal component of blood, and eventhough high levels can lead to gout, urate might also have beneficial effects because it is a potent antioxidant. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive nerve disorder linked to destruction of brain cells producing dopamine, a neurotransmitter essential to the normal functioning of the central nervous system.

"This is the strongest evidence to date that urate may protect against Parkinson's disease," said lead author Marc Weisskopf, Assistant Professor of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology at HSPH.

The scientists used the HSPH-based Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a population of male health professionals established in 1986, as the source for their data. The study cohort included more than 18,000 men without Parkinson's disease who had provided blood samples between 1993 and 1995 and whose subsequent health status was followed.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


June 22, 2007, 4:37 AM CT

Smoking rate has plummeted in New York City

Smoking rate has plummeted in New York City
New York Citys smoking rate has plummeted since a comprehensive program against smoking was launched in 2002, as per findings issued today in the national Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). The 2006 rate was nearly 20% lower than the 2002 rate -- a decline that represents 240,000 fewer smokers. The Citys rate for 2006 is the lowest on record (17.5%), and lower than all but five U.S. states (California, Washington, Idaho, Utah and Connecticut). Over the past year, smoking decreased among men (from 22.5% to 19.9%) and among Hispanics (from 20.2% to 17.1%). These large declines followed a year-long ad campaign aimed at prompting more smokers to quit. The new report is available online at www.cdc.gov/mmwr/.

Beginning in 2002, and after a decade with no progress, New York City increased the tobacco tax, eliminated smoking in virtually all workplaces, and launched hard-hitting anti-tobacco ads. By all indications, the interventions have made a difference. Hard-hitting ads work, said Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas R. Frieden -- particularly when theyre paired with a tobacco tax and smoke-free air legislation. With nearly a quarter of a million fewer smokers, New York City is leading the way on tobacco control. There arent a number of programs that can prevent 80,000 premature deaths this quickly.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


June 20, 2007, 10:11 AM CT

Brain's voluntary chain-of-command

Brain's voluntary chain-of-command
Scientists exploring the upper reaches of the brain's command hierarchy were astonished to find not one but two brain networks in charge, represented by the differently-colored spheres on the brain image above. Starting with a group of several brain regions implicated in top-down control (the spheres on the brain), they used a new brain-scanning technique to identify which of those regions work with each other. When they graphed their results (bottom half), using shapes to represent different brain regions and connecting brain regions that work with each other with lines, they found the regions grouped together into two networks. The regions in each network talked to each other often but never talked to brain regions in the other network.
Credit: Washington University
June 19, 2007 -- A probe of the upper echelons of the human brain's chain-of-command has found good evidence that there are not one but two complementary commanders in charge of the brain, as per neuroresearchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

It's as if Captains James T. Kirk and Jean-Luc Picard were both on the bridge and in command of the same starship Enterprise.

In reality, these two captains are networks of brain regions that do not consult each other but still work toward a common purpose control of voluntary, goal-oriented behavior. This includes a vast range of activities from reading a word to searching for a star to singing a song, but likely does not include involuntary behaviors such as control of the pulse rate or digestion.

"This was a big surprise. We knew several brain regions contribute to top-down control, but most of us thought we'd eventually show all those regions linking together in one system, one little guy up top telling everyone else what to do," says senior author Steven Petersen, Ph.D., James S. McDonnell Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience and professor of neurology and psychology.

The findings, published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may aid efforts to understand the effects of brain injury and develop new strategies to treat such injuries.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


June 20, 2007, 10:08 AM CT

1-step breast cancer treatment

1-step breast cancer treatment
Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) breast cancer specialists are using a new way to treat patients by delivering a one-time dose of radiation during surgery. The procedure, called intraoperative radiation therapy, takes less than an hour and eliminates the need for further radiation treatments.

On May 17, the PMH team combined the expertise of surgeons, radiation medicine specialists (radiation oncologists, physicists and therapists) and nurses to perform its first procedure. It marked the first time the portable intrabeam radiotherapy machine that makes this procedure possible has been used in Canada. The PMH team has since treated two more patients.

The potential benefits to patients are huge, says lead surgeon Dr. David McCready, who also heads the PMH Breast Cancer Program. Treating the specific area of cancer with this kind of precision protects the skin, heart and lungs from unnecessary radiation, minimizes side effects, and saves the patient a lot of time.

Heres how it works: Using a probe attached to the portable intrabeam radiotherapy machine, a single, concentrated dose is inserted directly into the affected area inside the breast during surgery. Dr. McCready says the one-time dose is biologically equivalent to conventional radiation treatments for breast cancer that typically require, on average, a minimum of 16 treatments over three weeks.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


June 20, 2007, 10:05 AM CT

Obesity And Enlarged Heart

Obesity And Enlarged Heart
New research from The University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center helps explain why excessive body weight increases the risk for heart disease.

In the largest study of its kind, heart specialist M. Reza Movahed, MD, PhD, and research specialist Adolfo A. Martinez, MD, discovered that excessive body weight is linked to a thickening of the heart muscle in the left ventricle, the hearts pumping chamber. Known to physicians as left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), the condition potentially can lead to heart failure and rhythm problems.

We found that the thickening in the muscle wall becomes particularly noticeable in obese patients who have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or greater, says Dr. Movahed. Prior studies have shown that left ventricular hypertrophy is linked to a higher risk of mortality.

Analyzing 17,261 heart ultrasounds, the UA scientists studied moving images of the heart to evaluate structure and function. Results showed that narrowing of the aortic valve, the main valve that carries blood away from the heart to the rest of the body, was the strongest predictor of LVH, followed by gender and Body Mass Index.

While the cause of LVH in obese patients is not known, it may be correlation to increased work load or to the presence of other cardiac risk factors in these patients.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


June 20, 2007, 10:02 AM CT

How Enzymes Work?

How Enzymes Work?
In a publication selected as a "2007 Hot Article" by the journal Biochemistry, University at Buffalo chemists report the discovery of a central mechanism responsible for the action of the powerful biological catalysts known as enzymes.

The UB research provides critical insight into why catalysis is so complex and may help pave the way for improving the design of synthetic catalysts.

"The more that is known about catalysis, the better chances we have of designing active catalysts," said John P. Richard, Ph.D., professor of chemistry in the UB College of Arts and Sciences and co-author of the paper with Tina L. Amyes, Ph.D., UB adjunct associate professor of chemistry.

"Attempts to replicate evolution and design catalysts of non-biological reactions with enzyme-like activity have failed, because researchers have yet to unravel the secrets of enzyme catalysis," Richard said.

But, he said, these secrets, once revealed, have the potential to transform the chemical industry in processes ranging from soft-drink manufacturing to the production of ethanol and countless other industrial processes.

"Enzymes are the products of billions of years of cellular evolution," he said.

While attempts to design catalysts have been somewhat successful, the catalysis that results is far less efficient than that produced by reactions with enzymes.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   172   173   174   175   176   177   178   179   180   181   182   183   184   185   186   187   188   189   190   191   192   193   194   195   196   197   198   199   200   201   202   203   204   205   206   207   208   209   210   211   212   213   214   215   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   224   225   226  

Did you know?
Studies in monkeys and women suggest that unlike traditional estrogen therapy, a diet high in the natural plant estrogens found in soy does not increase the risk of uterine cancer in postmenopausal women, according to Mark Cline, D.V.M., Ph.D., an associate professor of comparative medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.