MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of pancreatic cancer blog


Go Back to the main pancreatic cancer blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Pancreatic Cancer Blog From Medicineworld.Org


March 29, 2007, 5:10 AM CT

Link Between Smoking AndPancreatic Cancer

Link Between Smoking AndPancreatic Cancer
Scientists at Michigan State University have added yet another piece to the puzzle that links cigarette smoking with cancer of the pancreas, one of the deadliest forms of cancer.

In research reported in the recent issue of the International Journal of Cancer, MSUs James Trosko and his colleagues zeroed in on the mechanism by which a healthy cell turns malignant.

Specifically, they observed that the chemicals produced by the burning of tobacco products polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs interfere with communication between the bodys cells. More importantly, the work showed that some of these chemicals dont necessarily initiate the cancer, but rather contribute to the promotion of it.

"These PAH chemicals are correlation to the multistage, multimechanism process of carcinogenesis, not by mutating the stem cell, but by triggering the stem cell thats been previously mutated to proliferate," said Trosko, a professor of pediatrics and human development. "This finding has major implications, including the possibility that dietary intervention might interrupt or even reverse the promotion of pancreas cancers".

Until now, most researchers thought that specific PAHs produced by burning tobacco mutated genes which, in turn, triggered the cancer mechanism.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


January 9, 2007, 9:38 PM CT

Pancreatic Cancer Surgery Five-Year Survivors

Pancreatic Cancer Surgery Five-Year Survivors
A new study shows that pancreas cancer patients 65 or older who live at least five years after surgery have nearly as good a chance as anyone else to live another five years.

Scientists at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia evaluated the records of 890 patients with pancreas cancer who underwent the standard pancreaticoduodenectomy, or Whipple procedure, which entails the removal of the gallbladder, common bile duct, part of the duodenum, and the head of the pancreas, between 1970 and 1999 at Johns Hopkins University. They identified those who lived for five years, and compared those who lived for at least an additional five years to the "actuarial" - or estimated - survival of the general population beginning at age 70.

Reporting in the journal Surgery, they observed that 201 patients (23 percent) lived five years after surgery, at least half of whom were 65 years old or older at the time of surgery. Of those five-year survivors, an estimated 65 percent lived at least an additional five years. In the general population, roughly 87 percent of the same age group live another five years.

The study has an important message, says Charles Yeo, M.D., Samuel Gross Professor and Chair of Surgery at Jefferson Medical College, who led the work. "A decade ago, a number of clinicians thought that there was little reason to operate on patients with pancreatic ductal cancer, that surgery does little to extend life and improve the quality of life," says Dr. Yeo. "Not too long ago, few lived for five years after diagnosis. Today that's not true. There's been a paradigm shift in the way we treat and think about this disease."........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


December 13, 2006, 4:48 AM CT

Gene That Causes Familial Pancreatic Cancer

Gene That Causes Familial Pancreatic Cancer
An international group of scientists has discovered that the mutated form of a gene called Palladin causes familial pancreas cancer. The findings, published online today (Dec. 12) in the peer-evaluated journal PLoS-Medicine, may help explain why the disease is so deadly. The research project was led by Dr. Teri Brentnall, University of Washington associate professor of medicine, and supported by The Lustgarten Foundation, Canary Foundation, and other private sources.

Pancreas cancer is commonly a fatal diagnosis. One of the deadliest types of cancer, it is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths overall, and third-leading cause of cancer deaths for people aged 40 to 60 in the United States. Most people with the disease die within a year of diagnosis; about 95 percent of patients die within five years. Scientists estimate that at least ten percent of all pancreas cancer cases are inherited.

The discovery also reveals that the Palladin gene behaves abnormally in both the hereditary and non-hereditary, or sporadic, forms of pancreas cancer. Prior studies by co-author Dr. Carol Otey, associate professor of physiology at the University of North Carolina, have revealed that when the Palladin gene is functioning properly, it gives a cell its shape and enables the cell to move. In the case of pancreas cancer, a mutation in Palladin allows the cell to move much more quickly than normal, essentially invading the surrounding, healthy tissue.........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


December 7, 2006, 9:49 PM CT

Blood Pressure Drugs Could Halt Pancreatic Cancer Spread

Blood Pressure Drugs Could Halt Pancreatic Cancer Spread
Common blood pressure medications might help block the spread of pancreas cancer, scientists at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia have found. The researchers showed in laboratory studies that two types of pressure-lowering drugs - ACE inhibitors and AT1R blockers - may help reduce the development of tumor-feeding blood vessels, a process called angiogenesis. Such drugs, they say, may become part of a novel strategy to control the growth and spread of cancer.

As per Hwyda Arafat, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of surgery at Jefferson Medical College, prior studies have linked a lower cancer incidence with the inhibition of the pancreas hormone angiotensin II (Ang II) by either ACE (Angiotensin I converting enzyme) inhibitors or AT1R (Ang II type 1 receptor) blockers. Ang II increases the production of VEGF, a vascular factor that promotes blood vessel growth in many cancers. High VEGF levels have been correlated with poor cancer prognosis and early recurrence. ACE is the enzyme that converts Ang I to Ang II.

Dr. Arafat and her co-workers examined the protein of both invasive pancreas cancer and normal pancreatic tissue, analyzing the expression of ACE and AT1R in relation to VEGF. They also looked at the effects of blood pressure drugs captopril, an ACE inhibitor, and losartan, an AT1R blocker, on VEGF production in cancer cell lines.........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


November 2, 2006, 5:29 PM CT

Smoking Related Cancers

Smoking Related Cancers
There are currently about fifty million smokers in the U.S. and there are another fifty million ex-smokers. Cigarette smoking has been linked to several human malignancies. Some of these links like the relationship between smoking and lung cancer are well established. In some other cases the relationship between smoking and cancer is not very well established. However several studies have clearly shown the malignant potential of chemical substances in cigarette smoke. This article is an attempt to summarize some of the known links between cigarette smoking and caner.

Lung cancer

Lung cancer has a strong association with smoking. On average, smokers increase their risk of lung cancer between 5 and 10-fold compared to never smokers. Even though lung cancer can occur in non-smokers, it should be appreciated that more than 90 percent of all lung cancer patients are current or past smokers. Some sub types of lung cancer like small cell lung cancer is more strongly associated with smoking than others. There is plenty of research evidence in the literature linking lung cancer to smoking. A recent study published in the British Journal Of Medicine (Ref: BMJ 1997) concluded that the accumulated evidence support the fact secondhand exposure to cigarette smoke could lead to lung cancer. ........

Posted by: Agarwaal MD      Permalink


October 11, 2006, 8:58 PM CT

Test To Predict Response In Pancreatic Cancer

Test To Predict Response In Pancreatic Cancer Antonio Jimeno, M.D.
By slicing up bits of patient tumors and grafting them into mice, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center specialists have figured out how to accurately "test drive" chemotherapy drugs to learn in advance which drug therapys offer each individual pancreas cancer patient the best therapeutic journey.

Eventhough "xenografting" with either cells or fresh tissue is already used widely to test cancer therapies, the Hopkins design is personalized to each patient who has relapsed after an initial course of chemotherapy. "Eventually our approach offers a promising way to individualize treatment earlier in therapy instead of first giving everyone the standard drug gemcitabine, which has a success rate of less than 10 percent," says Antonio Jimeno, M.D., instructor in oncology at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Results of preliminary tests of the Hopkins method in 14 patient samples taken after surgery shows that each xenografts' genetic profile remained stable through three and four generations of mice so that "test drives" would accurately represent a patient's tumor. The researchers also found they could build xenografts in 80 percent of their pancreatic patients, a success rate higher than efforts with patients with colon cancer, for which rates are typically less at about 50 percent.........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


October 3, 2006, 5:07 AM CT

Progress In Pancreatic Cancer Research

Progress In Pancreatic Cancer Research
Scientists at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and the Brooklyn VA Hospital have observed that when a human protein, PNC-28, is administered to pancreatic tumor cells in animals, the tumors are destroyed. The research was published in the October 1st edition of the International Journal of Cancer.

Matthew R. Pincus, MD, PhD, professor of pathology at SUNY Downstate and chairman of pathology and laboratory medicine at the Brooklyn VA, said, "The results are very encouraging. PNC-28 may be an effective agent in treating cancers, particularly if delivered directly to the tumor".

PNC-28 is a p53 peptide, a naturally occurring human protein known to suppress tumor growth. The scientists previously observed that PNC-28 induces death of a variety of human tumor cell lines, including a pancreas cancer cell line, while not harming healthy cells.

The research team has now given PNC-28 to laboratory animals to test its ability to block the growth of pancreas cancer cells. When administered over a two-week period in the peritoneal cavities of mice containing simultaneously transplanted tumors, PNC-28 caused complete destruction of these tumors.

When delivered concurrently with tumor implantation, PNC-28 completely blocked tumor growth during the two-week period of administration and two weeks post-treatment, followed by weak tumor growth that leveled off at low tumor sizes.........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


September 12, 2006, 4:53 AM CT

Vitamin D Cuts Pancreatic Cancer Risk By Half

Vitamin D Cuts Pancreatic Cancer Risk By Half
Consumption of Vitamin D tablets was found to cut the risk of pancreas cancer nearly in half, as per a research studyled by scientists at Northwestern and Harvard universities.

The findings point to Vitamin D's potential to prevent the disease, and is one of the first known studies to use a large-scale epidemiological survey to examine the relationship between the nutrient and cancer of the pancreas. The study, led by Halcyon Skinner, Ph.D., of Northwestern, appears in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

The study examined data from two large, long-term health surveys and observed that taking the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowance of Vitamin D (400 IU/day) reduced the risk of pancreas cancer by 43 percent. By comparison, those who consumed less than 150 IUs per day experienced a 22 percent reduced risk of cancer. Increased consumption of the vitamin beyond 400 IUs per day resulted in no significant increased benefit.

"Because there is no effective screening for pancreas cancer, identifying controllable risk factors for the disease is essential for developing strategies that can prevent cancer," said Skinner.

"Vitamin D has shown strong potential for preventing and treating prostate cancer, and areas with greater sunlight exposure have lower incidence and mortality for prostate, breast, and colon cancers, leading us to investigate a role for Vitamin D in pancreas cancer risk. Few studies have examined this association, and we did observe a reduced risk for pancreas cancer with higher intake of Vitamin D".........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


June 19, 2006, 9:24 PM CT

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld
As you are aware we are the leading publishers of health news on the web. We publish news items in various forms including numerous blogs and news items. We invite you to participate in our new collection.

We are looking for quality news items that would be interesting to our readers. Now you may suggest the news item from your site to be included at Medicineworld.org. Inclusion of news item at our site get instantaneous attention since the item is illustrated from various blog posts. Addition of pictures to the item adds additional attraction to your news item. Inclusion in the Medicineworld.org site brings quality links and visitors to your site.

If you have an interesting news item related to health, share it with Medicineworld.org and we share it with the world.

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink


June 14, 2006, 0:07 AM CT

Pancreatic Cancer Surgery Can Help Those Over 80

Pancreatic Cancer Surgery Can Help Those Over 80
Age doesn't necessarily have to be the deciding factor for cancer surgery, Jefferson Medical College surgeons have found.

Pancreas cancer surgeon Charles J. Yeo, M.D., Samuel D. Gross Professor and chair of surgery at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia and Jefferson's Kimmel Cancer Center, and colleagues studied records of pancreatic surgery during the last 35 years at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and found that contrary to what a number of both in and out of medicine may believe, major pancreas cancer surgery can successfully be performed on patients in their 80s, 90s and even older.

In the study, reported recently in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Dr. Yeo and co-workers examined records of nearly 2,700 cases of the standard Whipple operation for pancreatic disease, including cancer. Of these, about 1,000 operations were performed in the last four years. The Whipple procedure entails the surgical removal of the head of the pancreas, the duodenum (part of the small intestine), part of the common bile duct, the gallbladder and sometimes a portion of the stomach.

Of this group, 207 patients were 80 years old or older. Those who were 80 to 89 years of age had a mortality rate of 4.1 percent (8 of 197), and a complication rate of 52.8 percent. Those younger than 80 years old had a mortality rate of 1.7 percent, with a complication rate of 41.6 percent. Of 10 patients 90 or older, the scientists reported no deaths after surgery, though half had complications. Of those 80 to 89 years old, 59.1 percent lived for at least one year, while 60 percent of patients 90 years and older lived that long after surgery.........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source



Older Blog Entries   1  

Did you know?
A gene therapy that prevents tumour cells from growing in mice could one day offer hope to sufferers of hard-to-treat pancreas cancer, new research suggests.Pancreas cancer is the fifth-leading cause of cancer deaths in the West and is virtually untreatable - only 3% of patients are alive five years after diagnosis. Most die within six months of diagnosis, since symptoms do not commonly appear until the cancer is very advanced.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of pancreatic cancer blog

Advances in pancreatic cancer treatment| Detailed information on pancreatic cancer| Pancreas cancer main| Major topics in pancreatic cancer| Overview of pancreatic cancer| Pancreatic cancer resources| More resources for pancreatic cancer| Resources 3 for pancreatic cancer| Resources4 for pancreatic cancer| Resources5 for pancreatic cancer| Resources6 for pancreatic cancer| Resources7 for pancreatic cancer| Resources8 for pancreatic cancer|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.