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From Medicineworld.org: Esophageal Cancer News Blog

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October 20, 2010, 7:40 AM CT

Vitamin D in preventing esophageal cancer

Vitamin D in preventing esophageal cancer

In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, physicians at University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center who are Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine scientists are exploring the role of Vitamin D in preventing esophageal cancer. Principal Investigator Linda Cummings, MD, along with Amitabh Chak, MD, and Gregory Cooper, MD, from the UH Digestive Health Institute, is recruiting patients with Barrett's esophagus to measure the effects of Vitamin D on protein levels that may influence the risk of developing esophageal cancer.

"Vitamin D is being studied for its role in possibly reducing the risk of developing several types of cancer, such as colon, breast and prostate," says Dr. Cummings, a gastroenterologist with the UH Digestive Health Institute and Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "This novel study is the first-of-its-kind looking at Vitamin D's potential role in helping to prevent esophageal cancer." As per co-investigator Sanford Markowitz, MD, Ingalls Professor of Cancer Genetics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and oncologist with UH Case Medical Center, the study "has the potential to make a highly important contribution to the medical management of Barrett's esophagus, which is becoming an ever increasing challenge".........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


February 20, 2009, 6:15 AM CT

Molecular target esophageal cancer

Molecular target esophageal cancer
The cadherin superfamily has a correlate relationship with the invasion and metastasis of carcinoma. It has been suggested that, unlike E-cadherin, N-cadherin may promote motility and invasion in carcinoma cells. To explore clinical pathological significance of E-cadherin and N-cadherin expressions in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a research team led by Prof. Qing-Xia Fan from China detected the expression of E-cadherin and N-cadherin in 62 cases of normal esophageal epithelium, 31 cases of adjacent atypical hyperplasia epithelium and 62 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.Their study will be published on February 14, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology

They observed that the positive rates of N-cadherin decreased in the carcinoma, adjacent atypical hyperplastic and normal esophageal tissues (75.8%, 61.3% and 29.0%, P < 0.05), respectively, while those of E-cadherin increased (40.3%, 71.0% and 95.2%, P < 0.05). The increased expression of N-cadherin and decreased expression of E-cadherin were correlation to invasion, differentiation, and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). The expression level of N-cadherin decreased in the N-cadherin knocked down cells, and the invasiveness of those cells decreased significantly as well. The number of cells which crossed the basement membrane filter decreased from 123.40 8.23 to 49.60 6.80 (P < 0.05).........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


October 10, 2007, 5:49 PM CT

Obesity boosts oesophageal cancer

Obesity boosts oesophageal cancer
Obese people are six times as likely to develop gullet (oesophageal) cancer as people of healthy weight, shows research published ahead of print in the journal Gut.

Rates of oesophageal cancer have been rising rapidly, and in some countries, they have risen faster than those of every other major cancer, say the authors.

The findings are based on a comparison of almost 800 people with oesophageal cancer and almost 1600 randomly selected people eligible to vote, who did not have the disease.

Men and those under the age of 50 were particularly vulnerable, the findings showed.

The link between acid reflux and gullet cancer is well known, and unsurprisingly, repeated symptoms of severe heartburn or gastrointestinal reflux disease (GORD) were linked to a much higher risk of the cancer.

And the more frequent the symptoms, the greater was the likelihood of having oesophageal cancer.

GORD quintupled the risk of oesophageal cancer, and a combination of obesity and acid reflux boosted the chances of having it by a factor of 16.

But people who were clinically obese had a much higher risk of oesophageal cancer than those whose weight was in the healthy range, regardless of whether they had reflux disease or not.

Those with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more were six times as likely to have the cancer as those with a BMI between 18.5 and 25.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


September 26, 2007, 8:58 PM CT

Married oesophageal cancer patients fare worse

Married oesophageal cancer patients fare worse
In a surprising finding, American researchers have observed that when battling oesophageal cancer, married patients don't fare as well as their single counterparts in certain aspects of their quality of life.

In the study, presented today (Wednesday) at the European Cancer Conference (ECCO 14) in Barcelona, 212 oesophageal cancer patients and 489 patients with Barrett's oesophagus, a non-malignant condition associated with acid reflux, filled out two quality of life questionnaires a year apart. Changes in the scores between the two assessments were analysed as per marital status.

No differences in quality of life changes over time were seen between marital states in the patients with Barrett's oesophagus. That finding was expected because the condition is not a potentially fatal one requiring stressful major therapy.

"In general, there were not major differences in quality of life between single and married oesophageal cancer patients, but there were slight differences in some aspects," said the study's lead researcher, Dr. Robert Miller, an assistant professor of oncology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

For the single patients, quality of life scores relating to pain frequency, overall physical wellbeing and legal worries improved between the first and second questionnaire. However, married patients reported less improvement in their legal worries than the single patients did, and worsening physical wellbeing and increasing pain frequency over time.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


August 18, 2006, 6:52 AM CT

How Acid Reflux Leads To Esophageal Cancer

How Acid Reflux Leads To Esophageal Cancer
A particular enzyme is significantly higher in cancer cells that have been exposed to acid, leading to the overproduction of hydrogen peroxide, and offering a possible explanation for how acid reflux may lead to cancer of the esophagus, as per a recent study in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

The study observed that the enzyme NOX5-S is affected by exposure to acid and that it produces stress on cells, activating genes that lead to DNA damage. For the first time, scientists have outlined the signaling pathway from cells damaged by acid, to the progression of esophageal cancer. They believe the same process may happen in the body when cells are exposed to acid reflux.

"The role of acid is controversial. But we show that by exposing cells to acid for short periods of time, that affects a particular enzyme, triggering a chain of events that possibly leads to cancer of the esophagus. Now that we have a better understanding of the signaling pathway, we can possibly identify who is at risk of developing cancer by determining the levels of this enzyme," says senior author Weibiao Cao, a researcher at Rhode Island Hospital and an assistant professor of medicine and surgery at Brown Medical School.

The study looked at human cancer cells and biopsies from patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE), a condition where cells in the esophagus have been altered by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or acid reflux. Acid reflux is thought to bea major risk factor for cancer in people with Barrett's esophagus.........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


June 19, 2006, 9:23 PM CT

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld
As you are aware we are the leading publishers of health news on the web. We publish news items in various forms including numerous blogs and news items. We invite you to participate in our new collection.

We are looking for quality news items that would be interesting to our readers. Now you may suggest the news item from your site to be included at Medicineworld.org. Inclusion of news item at our site get instantaneous attention since the item is illustrated from various blog posts. Addition of pictures to the item adds additional attraction to your news item. Inclusion in the Medicineworld.org site brings quality links and visitors to your site.

If you have an interesting news item related to health, share it with Medicineworld.org and we share it with the world.

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink


April 11, 2006, 11:17 PM CT

More Than Half Of Esophageal Cancer Patients Now Survive

More Than Half Of Esophageal Cancer Patients Now Survive
In part because the nature of the disease has changed, nearly 50 percent of patients with esophageal cancer that undergo an advanced surgical procedure now survive for five years, not 20 percent as once thought, as per an article reported in the April edition of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center contend that earlier diagnoses, more widespread screening and individualized care have made surgery by far the best way to combat esophageal cancer as it is most often diagnosed today.

Whether surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or some combination of them should be the standard of care has been debated for years. Until recently, surgery has been considered the gold standard, but its role has been questioned by some medical oncologists based on their assumption that surgery comes with a high risk of complications and small chance of survival. In a number of cases today, oncologists will try chemotherapy and radiation first, completely avoiding surgery. Authors of the current study argue that the information used to make those decisions is dated, and that the surgery is the most effective approach in a number of patients.

"Those who argue against surgery for esophageal cancer cite surgical mortality rates of up to 15 percent and low five-year postoperative survival rates of 20 percent to justify their approach," said Jeffrey H. Peters, M.D., Chair of the Department of Surgery at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) and Surgeon-in-chief of Strong Memorial Hospital. "What's worrying is that therapy decisions are being made based on decades-old experiences with a type of esophageal cancer that most patients no longer have, and on fears about problems with surgery that are no longer a concern. Our study found that the five-year survival of patients after surgical resection for esophageal adenocarcinoma is better than that reported for any other form of treatment," said Peters, co-author of the journal article.........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


March 23, 2006, 9:13 PM CT

Which Esophageal Cancer Patient Will Respond To Treatment

Which Esophageal Cancer Patient Will Respond To Treatment
New research at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center shows that Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is more accurate than conventional imaging in identifying patients who have good responses to chemotherapy and radiation therapy -- a finding that could one day help some patients avoid surgery.

The results, from a study of 64 patients with esophageal cancer, are reported in the recent issue of Annals of Surgery. PET, a technology that produces images of the metabolic function of tissue, was used to test patients for cancer after therapy with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation (chemoradiation).

"While additional multi-center studies are needed, the research clearly shows that PET is a useful tool for identifying patients who respond well to chemoradiation," said Edward A. Levine, M.D., lead investigator. "Being able to identify these responders may alter the need to take some patients to surgery."

Over the past two decades, the most common therapy for esophageal cancer has been chemoradiation followed by surgery. Even with these therapys, the prognosis is poor for most patients, with long-term control rates of 25 to 35 percent. Some patients, however, respond well to chemoradiation and have improved long-term survival.

Identifying which patients will respond to chemoradiation alone -- and perhaps avoid surgery to remove part of the esophagus -- has been difficult. Conventional imaging, including both computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), are poor predictors of response to chemoradiation.........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


December 25, 2005, 10:32 AM CT

Merry Christmas To All Our Readers

Merry Christmas To All Our Readers
Medicineworld wishes all our readers merry Christmas.

Oh, jingle bells, jingle bells

Jingle all the way

Oh, what fun it is to ride

In a one horse open sleigh

Jingle bells, jingle bells

Jingle all the way

Oh, what fun it is to ride

In a one horse open sleigh........

Daniel      Permalink


December 13, 2005

Aspirin May Cut Risk of Esophageal Cancer

Aspirin May Cut Risk of Esophageal Cancer
Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, may significantly reduce the risk of esophageal cancer among people with Barrett's esophagus, a premalignant condition associated with chronic heartburn that affects an estimated 1 million to 2 million Americans.

These findings, by Thomas L. Vaughan, M.D., M.P.H., and his colleagues at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, will appear Nov. 8 in the online edition of The Lancet Oncology. Scientists at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle and The Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston also collaborated on the study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

In the largest and longest observational study of its kind, lead author Vaughan and his colleagues studied the impact of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, on changes in the lining of the esophagus that signal the advancement toward cancer.

"We found that people with Barrett's esophagus who regularly took NSAIDs like aspirin or ibuprofen did not go on to get cancer as frequently or as soon as people who did not take these medications regularly," said Vaughan, head of the Epidemiology Program and member of the Hutchinson Center's Public Health Sciences Division. "Current users of NSAIDs had one-third the risk of getting esophageal adenocarcinoma as compared to never users," he said.

Five years after joining the study, the incidence of esophageal cancer was 14.4 percent among never users, 9.7 percent among former users (those who had used NSAIDs regularly for a year or more previous to joining the study) and 6.6 percent among current users (those who took NSAIDs at least once a week).

Because this was a long-term observational study and not a clinical trial, the investigators cannot recommend NSAIDs for people with Barrett's esophagus and they advise anyone who considers taking these medications for this condition should do so under the direction of a physician.........

Sue      Permalink

  • Acid Reflux May Be Linked To Esophageal Cancer (November 23, 2005)
  • NSAIDs may cut risk of esophageal cancer (November 16, 2005)
  • Zinc Deficiency Linked To Increased Risk Of Less--Common Form Of Esophageal Cancer    (February 23, 2005)



  • Did you know?
    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, may significantly reduce the risk of esophageal cancer among people with Barrett's esophagus, a premalignant condition associated with chronic heartburn that affects an estimated 1 million to 2 million Americans.

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