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Do You Read All Of Our Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Blogs?
This page you have reached is an archive of old blog posting. Just follow the links below to go to the main blog pages to read the latest blog posting.

Do you read all of the blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on the various health related topics. We publish the following blogs at this time.

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. Through this cancer blog my friends and I try to bring stories of hope for patients with cancer. The cancer blog often republishes important blog posts from other cancer related blogs at Medicineworld.org. If you are searching for a blog that covers wide variety of cancer topics, this may be the one for you.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Emily and other bloggers and they bring you the latest stories, news and events that are related to breast cancer. Increasing awareness about breast cancer among women and in the general population is the main goal of this breast cancer blog.

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is managed by Scott with the help of other bloggers. Through this blog Scott and his friends constantly remind the readers about the dangers of smoking. It's a never-ending struggle against this miserable disease with which a social stigma of smoking is associated.

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and other bloggers. Sue brings a personal touch to the colon cancer blog since her mother died of colon cancer few years ago. She writes about stories, research news and advances in treatment related to colon cancer.

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men. American Cancer Society estimates that over 230,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur in the United state every year. This important blog about prostate cancer is run by Mark and other bloggers. This blog brings news, stories, and other personal observations related to prostate cancer.

Medicineworld.org publishes a diabetes watch blog and this blog is run by JoAnn other bloggers. This diabetes watch blog brings you the latest in the field of diabetes. This includes personal stories, advances in diagnosis and treatment, and other observations about diabetes. Improving awareness about diabetes is an important mission of this group.

Heart watch blog: About 13 million Americans suffer from coronary artery disease. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in American men and women amounting a staggering 20 percent of all causes of death. The tremendous responsibility of running a heart blog is entrusted to Daniel. He is creating blog posts with the help and support of other bloggers.

Janet      

Nov 21, 2005

Lapatinib Shows Promise in Breast cancer

Lapatinib Shows Promise in Breast cancer
An orally administered drug under development by GlaxoSmithKline shows promise as a therapy for breast cancer.

A report in the journal Core Evidence says between 10 percent and 38 percent of women with metastatic breast cancer responded to treatment with lapatinib.

"The best results with lapatinib appear to be in patients overexpressing the markers ErbB2 and/or ErbB1, which means it will be possible to target those patients most likely to benefit from treatment," said Andrew Thomson, the author of the study.

Thomson said that lapatinib is a biologic therapy, which will help women whose cancers are not hormone-receptive. Women given the drug generally tolerated it well, while chemotherapy is often associated with bad side effects.

Janet      Permalink

Nov 21, 2005

Does Aspartame Cause Cancer?

Does Aspartame Cause Cancer?
When it comes to pop, I always to shelf and grab the diet product no matter it is Pepsi, Coke or Sprite. My thinking is that if a sweetener can fool my tongue, why add more calories. I know many of you are with me in this regard, but may be we may think for a second before we stretch our hands to get the next can of pop. Why?

A recent study in rats shows that the popular artificial sweetener aspartame can lead to a wide range of cancers. If this is true for human beings like you and I is still an open question. I know that of the 90 non-industry-sponsored studies evaluating the safety of Aspartame about, 83 (92%) identified one or more problems with aspartame.

Aspartame is found in many of the artificial sweetening products available in the market like Equal and is present in many other sugar-free products under the brand name NutraSweet. It is the second best-selling nonsugar sweetener in the world. Coke Zero is one product sweetened with aspartame.

With these findings researchers in Italy observed that rats exposed to varying doses of aspartame throughout their lives developed leukemias, lymphomas, and several other cancers in a dose-dependent manner.

They report that the product is a potential cancer-causing agent to humans even at levels that are less than half of what is considered safe by the U.S. government.

The study appears in the recent issue of the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.
Industry states that the investigators did not follow the guidelines for this scientific study. They further noted that their own animal studies involving similar levels of aspartame exposure showed no link between the sweetener and an increase in cancers.

Janet      Permalink

Nov 21, 2005

Infertility May Be A Marker For Testicular Cancer

Infertility May Be A Marker For Testicular Cancer
Isn't surprising to learn that men who are undergoing treatment for infertility are 20 times more likely than men in the general population to be diagnosed with testicular cancer. Hmm, that's the truth I guess.

A close friend of mine has been recently diagnosed with testicular cancer, but I don't know if he was infertile. This may be news to all of us and to many of the physicians as well. This information may highlight the importance of screening for testicular cancer in any male who is diagnosed with infertility.

The researchers say that infertility and testicular cancer may have a common origin in many cases, beyond the well-known risk associated with having a history of undescended testes, also known as cryptorchidism.

To come to this conclusion the researchers, Goldstein and colleagues from New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center reviewed charts from 3,800 men treated for infertility over a 10-year period at their center. Ten cases of testicular cancer were identified.

Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database, infertile men had a 22.6-fold increased risk of testicular cancer compared with men of similar age in the general population.

If a man is infertile, "even if he has enough sperm to achieve a pregnancy using assisted reproductive techniques, he should still be seen by a urinologist for an examination and possibly an ultrasound of the testicle," Goldstein said.

Janet      Permalink

Nov 20, 2005

How Chemotherapy-induced Leukemia Develops

How Chemotherapy-induced Leukemia Develops
About one in five hundred women who receive chemotherapy for the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer develop leukemia. This is a very high risk considering the fact the incidence in the general population is about one in 20,000.

Topoisomerase II inhibitors like doxorubicin are among the most successful chemotherapy drugs used to treat human cancer. But there is an inevitably increased risk of leukemia with these drugs.

Researchers at UC Davis Cancer Center have shed new light on this poorly understood process. In a study to be published in the recent issue of the journal Leukemia, the researchers report that topoisomerase II inhibitors do not directly cause leukemia - and suggest that it may be possible to prevent therapy-induced leukemia.

"There are two competing theories of how these therapy-induced leukemias arise," said Andrew Vaughan, a radiation biologist at UC Davis Cancer Center and senior author of the new study. "One is that the topoisomerase II inhibitor drugs, in combination with the topoisomerase II enzyme they target, induce random genetic changes that lead to leukemia onset. The other is that another, potentially correctable process is at work."

"This rearrangement appears to be independent of the topoisomerase II enzyme," Vaughan said. "This suggests that another process, such as apoptosis itself, is involved."

Janet      Permalink

Nov 20, 2005

Larger The Bra Size Higher The Breast Cancer Risk

Larger The Bra Size Higher The Breast Cancer Risk
Larger the size of the bra a woman uses, higher the risk of breast cancer as per new research findings from Harvard University. Women who wear D-cup bra size at a young age are at higher risk to develop premeno-pausal breast cancer, as per this study.

These findings are the result of analysis of 90,000 women who had normal weight but had a D-cup at the age of 20 and found that these women were significantly more likely to go on to develop the cancer than those wearing an A-cup. Researchers say that this finding provide evidence to the theory that increased mammary gland mass is associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer among women with normal and lean body mass.

The findings from the study are published in the International Journal of Cancer. These results confirmed the findings of previous studies that showed that pre-menopausal women who did not wear bras had half the risk of breast cancer compared to bra users.

The authors suggest that women who did not wear support were more likely to have smaller breasts.

Exactly why larger cup size could increase the risk of breast cancer is not clear.

One theory is that the breast cancer risk may rise as the total number of mammary gland cells and breast size increase. The size and development of the breast may be affected by early life events, such as diet and hormonal exposure, the study says.

Oestrogens also have an effect on mammary gland growth and development, and larger breasts may be a marker of higher exposures to these hormones, according to the research.

Janet      Permalink

Nov 18, 2005

Gene silencing therapy for cervical cancer

Gene silencing therapy for cervical cancer
Dr Nigel McMillan
Scientists at Princess Alexandra Hospital have pioneered a new approach for the treatment of cervical cancer. Lead scientist Dr Nigel McMillan said the finding was based on the method of "gene silencing", a novel technique to target and turn off single genes in a cell.

"Our research shows not only can we stop cervical cancer cells from growing in the test tube, but we can also completely eliminate the formation of cancer tumors in animal models," Dr McMillan said.

Professor Ian Frazer, Director of the CICR and developer of a vaccine for cervical cancer, said the research represented a significant step towards developing gene therapy for cervical cancer.

The research team was able to turn off the production of these genes in cancer cells, resulting in the death of the cancer.

"Because these viral genes are foreign we can treat normal cells and they remain unaffected by our treatment," Dr McMillan said.

"Development of treatments for humans would be an advance over the current treatments, radiation and chemotherapy, which kill not only cancer cells but also normal cells that leads to hair loss and nausea.

"We envisage such treatment will be used for all forms of cervical cancer including the pre-cancerous lesions picked up by the pap smear and especially for advanced cervical cancers where the cancer has moved to other sites such as the lung or liver."

Dr McMillan said the research also showed gene silencing enhanced the effect of chemotherapy by up to four times.

He said the findings suggest a cancer-specific treatment for advanced cervical cancers will be possible either alone or in combination with current treatments.

He said the next stage of research would focus on the development of materials for human trials to allow proper delivery of the drug to patients and to investigate whether other cancer types can be treated this way. A treatment using this technique is at least three years away.

Dr McMillan's findings were recently published in the prestigious Molecular Pharmacology journal.


Janet      Permalink

Nov 18, 2005

Pancreatic Cancer Vaccine Gives New Hope

Pancreatic Cancer Vaccine Gives New Hope
A new immune-boosting vaccine gives new hope in increasing the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest forms for which the treatment options are few.

As per the phase II trial results presented recently at a cancer meeting in Philadelphia, the 2 year survival of patients who had undergone surgery for the removal of their tumor increased from 42 percent to 76 percent by the use of this vaccine.

The vaccine has been designed for boosting up that the patient's immune responses to pancreatic cancer cells that might have been left behind after surgery, chemotherapy and radiation.

In the phase II trial, the vaccine was given to 60 patients whose pancreatic cancer was extracted. Their 1- and 2- years survival rate was found to be 88 percent and 76 percent respectively. Earlier studies have shown the corresponding survival rates to be 63 percent and 42 percent respectively when the vaccine was not given.

Study investigator Dr. Daniel Laheru, from Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore has alerted in his comment to Reuters health that though the findings are potentially good news for patients with early stage disease, only about 15 to 20% of the cancerous patients fit into this category.

He said that at the time of presentation most of the patients are in their advanced stage of cancer. He also told that last year his team has completed a study making use of a similar vaccine in patients in their advanced stage of pancreatic cancer and the results have been submitted for publication recently.


Janet      Permalink

Nov 17, 2005

New Hope For Pancreatic Cancer Patients

New Hope For Pancreatic Cancer Patients
If a person is diagnosed of Pancreatic Cancer, it often results in fear and confusion for the patient and the members of his family. Such patients would now be happy to hear that there is a way to increase pancreatic cancer survival.

Researchers have found that it is possible to prolong the lives of patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer by the intake of another chemotherapy drug along with the standard treatment.

According to study presented recently at the European Cancer Conference, the survival of patients whose cancer was inoperable was increased by another six months by the addition of the drug Xeloda or Capecitabine to the standard chemotherapy drug (Gemcitabine).

Dr. Margaret Tempero, Chief of medical oncology at the University of California at San Fransisco has stated that though this is a small improvement, that's what is followed in cancer therapy by moving ahead in a step-by-step way. "Though the patient group might not have benefited so much, a little change actually is a relatively big difference. So the combination drug method could be used for curing more people.

533 patients with inoperable pancreatic tumors were involved in a study led by scientists at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London. It was found that around 80 to 90% of the 250,000 cases diagnosed globally every year were suitable for this category. Addition of Xeloda resulted in an increase is survival of six weeks, increasing survival from six months.



Janet      Permalink

Nov 16, 2005

Erbitux With Radiation Improves Survival in Head and Neck Cancer

Erbitux With Radiation Improves Survival in Head and Neck Cancer
Erbitux combined with radiation treatment kept head and neck cancer from spreading over an average of 24.4 months, compared with 14.9 months using radiation alone as per Imclone who is manufacturing erbitux. The study also showed that head and neck cancer patients given Erbitux along with their radiation lived an average of 49 months during treatment, compared to the average of 29.3 months for those given radiation alone.

Erbitux is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat colon cancer. The company applied to the agency to expand its marketing approval to treat head and neck cancers along with radiation on Aug. 30. The FDA granted the application a priority review, cutting the review time to six months from 10 months, on Oct. 31.

Janet      Permalink







Nov 16, 2005

Predicting Response To Chemotherapy In Ovarian Cancer

Predicting Response To Chemotherapy In Ovarian Cancer
Gene expression is the conversion of gene information in a cell. Using various tools to study gene expression, including micorarray analysis scientists are now in a position to predict the response of chemotherapy treatment in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

In a recent issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology it has been mentioned that this gene expression profile could provide clinicians with insights into the mechanisms of drug resistance.

Stephen A. Cannistra, MD, director of gynecologic oncology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School has stated that "the goal of our current research is to help determine which patients will relapse and which will not, and the reason behind this."

Cannistra's group has been working to develop a genetic profile of ovarian cancer for enabling clinicians to more precisely determine a patient's prognosis. The first step in this process was to identify a gene expression profile known as the Ovarian Cancer Prognostic Profile (OCPP), which predicts the survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. A DNA technology known as microarray analysis has been used in their work, in which genes expressed by cancer cells are labeled and applied to a glass slide containing embedded sequences of thousands of known human genes. The genes that are present in the tumor cell attach with their counterpart sequences on the slide and can then be recognized through computer analysis.


Janet      Permalink



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Cancer
Cancer is a very common disease, approximately one out of every two American men and one out of every three American women will have some type of cancer at some point during the course of their life. Cancer is more common in the elderly and 77 percent of cancers occur in people above age 55 or older. Cancer is also common in children. Cancer incidence is said to have two peaks once during early childhood and then during late years in life. No age period is completely exempted from development of cancers. Some cancers occur predominantly in the elderly, other types occur in children, Cancer occurs in all ethnic races, however the cancer rates and rates of specific cancer types may vary from group to group. Late stages of cancer may be incurable in most cases, but with the advancement of medicine, more and more cancers are becoming curable.

Medicineworld.org: Cancer blog

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